I Heart Soul Food: 100 Southern Comfort Food Favorites


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From the beloved creator of I Heart Recipes and home cook Rosie Mayes comes a cookbook chock-full of soul food favorites.

Learn to cook comfort food the way Mom used to! Here Rosie shares all the secrets of southern classics like fried chicken, mashed potatoes, collard greens, and mac & cheese, plus soulful twists like Sweet Potato Biscuits and Fried Ribs. Authentic, approachable, and mouthwatering, these recipes use easy-to-find ingredients. Perfect for Sunday suppers and other celebrations as well as everyday favorites, these recipes are love on a plate!

Organized by meal, the cookbook starts with stick-to-your-ribs breakfast favorites like Blueberry Cornbread Waffles and Shrimp, and Andouille Sausage and Grits, plus plenty of main dishes and sides like Smothered Chicken, Oxtail Stew, Baked Candied Yams, Soul Food Collard Greens, and Sweet Cornbread. Don’t forget drinks and desserts like Peach Cobbler, Pralines, and Sweet Iced Tea! Includes 100+ recipes, including 30 fan favorites and 70 never-before-seen recipes, and 90 photographs.


From the Publisher

soul foodsoul food

I call it soul food. It includes the Jamaican food that my great-grandmother ate and the seafood-centric dishes that I make from the great stuff that’s available in the Pacific Northwest. But it’s all soul food because I use what I have and I put my all into it; I’m serving love on a plate.

waffles

waffles

Rosie

Rosie

okra and tomatoes

okra and tomatoes

Blueberry Cornbread Waffles

These waffles are a combination of my son’s two favorite foods (waffles and cornbread) and one of mine (blueberries). When I was growing up, we used to sometimes go out to breakfast at a local restaurant near my hometown of Seattle and get them.

“Rosie is my go-to when it comes to recipes.”

–Angie Thomas, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Hate U Give and On the Come Up

Black-Eyed Pea Salad

Every New Year’s Day when I was a kid, we would eat black-eyed peas because beans mean prosperity, and we were always hoping that this would be the year. In fact, we hoped so hard we would put out two kinds of black-eyed peas: the traditional hot version, made with ham hocks, and also this nice cold salad—why not double your luck?

deviled eggs

deviled eggs

ribs

ribs

okra

okra

Crab Deviled Eggs with Bacon

If you read the breakfast section, you know I hate bland eggs. So when I wanted to make some deviled eggs for a holiday party, I knew I needed to add my special twist. Crab packs the filling with briny flavor, and the bacon adds a smoky, meaty crunch.

Oven-Baked BBQ Ribs

My mom never grilled when I was growing up, so BBQ always meant the oven to us at home. Now that I’m grown up—and still live in the rainy Northwest—I think I have a few guesses as to why she did that. Don’t forget to serve these ribs with some of my Southern Potato Salad, and it’s just like the cookout, minus worrying about the weather.

Okra and Tomatoes

Okra and tomatoes go together like ham hocks and greens—they grow right alongside each other in the South, coming ripe in the same season, and pair up on the plate perfectly.

mac n cheese

mac n cheese

gumbo

gumbo

chicken fried steak

chicken fried steak

Soul Food Macaroni and Cheese

Asking me to choose a favorite macaroni and cheese recipe is like asking me to choose between Morris Chestnut and Idris Elba. I want it all! But when I had to pick one that deserved a spot in the book, I knew this was it. It’s a special one, the one I make for holidays, in part because it uses six kinds of cheese.

Gumbo

Gumbo is something of a sacred tradition among Louisiana folk—it’s basically just a big ol’ pot of seafood. Just don’t try to call it a stew—you’ll make the Creole people in my family real mad.

Church Lady Lemon Coconut Pound Cake

My aunt Nisha is like my second mom, and some Sundays she would bring me to her church. After service, they would have a dinner, and the desserts they served were all I could think about. This recipe is my homage to the masterful women behind the dessert table at my aunt Nisha’s church.

cinnamon rollscinnamon rolls

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